Mostly harmless

A sartorial outlook from under the Northern lights

Posts tagged hackett

136 notes &

Know thy rules
If you spend a lot of time reading blogs and forums on menswear and men’s style, you easily get the impression that there is a near-endless list of rules for dressing and that if you break but a single of them you are not considered well-dressed. While it is true that men’s style is confined by a relatively rigid set of “rules” that have developed over the last century, breaking one or a few of these rules is not a disaster. However, to successfully break rules you must understand why the rule is there in the first place. 
A great case in point is the rule that you should always leave the last button of you waistcoat unbuttoned. Like many other things in menswear, the origin this rules is not entirely entirely obvious. The most commonly accepted explanation, however, starts with King Edward VII of England who happened to leave his last waistcoat button open for comfor. The aristocracy around the king quickly adopted it as a “fashion statement” and over the year it turned into a “rule” so that if you are not doing doing it today you can easily end up looking ignorant of dress codes. In fact, many tailor on Savile Row (and elsewhere) have taken on the tradition to cut waistcoats so that it is physically impossible to close the last button, thus ensuring that you follow this “rule”.
Despite knowing all these (rather trivial, you may say) things, I have nevertheless chosen to close the last waistcoat button in the photo above. The reason for this is simple - the waistcoat is just a tad bit too short and the trousers have just a tad bit too low rise. These two unfortunate circumstances has the effect that if I would leave the last button undone, there is a high likelihood that shirt and/or tie would peek through below the waistcoat, and that is in my mind a much more serious sartorial faux pas. So if you if you are breaking an established rule of dressing, it is good to both know why the rule was there in the first place and also exactly why you are breaking it.

Know thy rules

If you spend a lot of time reading blogs and forums on menswear and men’s style, you easily get the impression that there is a near-endless list of rules for dressing and that if you break but a single of them you are not considered well-dressed. While it is true that men’s style is confined by a relatively rigid set of “rules” that have developed over the last century, breaking one or a few of these rules is not a disaster. However, to successfully break rules you must understand why the rule is there in the first place. 

A great case in point is the rule that you should always leave the last button of you waistcoat unbuttoned. Like many other things in menswear, the origin this rules is not entirely entirely obvious. The most commonly accepted explanation, however, starts with King Edward VII of England who happened to leave his last waistcoat button open for comfor. The aristocracy around the king quickly adopted it as a “fashion statement” and over the year it turned into a “rule” so that if you are not doing doing it today you can easily end up looking ignorant of dress codes. In fact, many tailor on Savile Row (and elsewhere) have taken on the tradition to cut waistcoats so that it is physically impossible to close the last button, thus ensuring that you follow this “rule”.

Despite knowing all these (rather trivial, you may say) things, I have nevertheless chosen to close the last waistcoat button in the photo above. The reason for this is simple - the waistcoat is just a tad bit too short and the trousers have just a tad bit too low rise. These two unfortunate circumstances has the effect that if I would leave the last button undone, there is a high likelihood that shirt and/or tie would peek through below the waistcoat, and that is in my mind a much more serious sartorial faux pasSo if you if you are breaking an established rule of dressing, it is good to both know why the rule was there in the first place and also exactly why you are breaking it.

Filed under hackett belisario berg & berg Turnbull & Asser featured

80 notes &

Peaked flannel
Peaked lapels on single-breasted jackets used to be rare (although not entirely without historical precedent), as they are generally considered to be more formal than notched lapels. These days, however, they seem to be much more common, presumably because they add some extra “flair” to a suit and a suit these days is pretty formal in itself. Personally I often find that they are just “too much”, especially if the lapels themselves are rather wide (which seems to be an emerging trend, thanks to designers like Tom Ford). While the lapels on the Hackett suit above are rather modest though, I still would have preferred them to be of the more traditional notched kind. The saving grace is that I mostly wear the jacket unbuttoned (it is a three-piece after all) and this creates an extended roll of the lapel that make the peaked lapels somewhat less prominent. 

Peaked flannel

Peaked lapels on single-breasted jackets used to be rare (although not entirely without historical precedent), as they are generally considered to be more formal than notched lapels. These days, however, they seem to be much more common, presumably because they add some extra “flair” to a suit and a suit these days is pretty formal in itself. Personally I often find that they are just “too much”, especially if the lapels themselves are rather wide (which seems to be an emerging trend, thanks to designers like Tom Ford). While the lapels on the Hackett suit above are rather modest though, I still would have preferred them to be of the more traditional notched kind. The saving grace is that I mostly wear the jacket unbuttoned (it is a three-piece after all) and this creates an extended roll of the lapel that make the peaked lapels somewhat less prominent. 

Filed under menswear hackett belisario vanda fine clothing Amanda Christensen featured